Soak Time For Common Seeds, Nuts, Beans and Grains

Soak Time For Common Seeds, Nuts, Beans and Grains  (referenced from http://www.raw-food-living.com/)

Nut / Seed Dry Amount Soak Time Sprout Time Sprout Length Yield
Alfalfa Seed 3 Tbsp 12 Hours 3-5 Days 1-2 Inches 4 Cups
Almonds 3 Cups 8-12 Hours 1-3 Days 1/8 Inch 4 Cups
Amaranth 1 Cup 3-5 Hours 2-3 Days 1/4 Inch 3 Cups
Barley, Hulless 1 Cup 6 Hours 12-24 Hours 1/4 Inch 2 Cups
Broccoli Seed 2 Tbsp 8 Hours 3-4 Days 1-2 Inches 2 Cups
Buckwheat, Hulled 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8-1/2 Inch 2 Cups
Cabbage Seed 1 Tbsp 4-6 Hours 4-5 Days 1-2 Inches 1 1/2 Cups
Cashews 3 Cups 2-3 Hours 4 Cups
Clover 3 Tbsp 5 Hours 4-6 Days 1-2 Inches 4 Cups
Fenugreek 4 Tbsp 6 Hours 2-5 Days 1-2 Inches 3 Cups
Flax Seeds 1 Cup 6 Hours 2 Cups
Garbanzo Beans
(Chick Pea)
1 Cup 12-48 Hours 2-4 Days 1/2-1 Inch 4 Cups
Kale Seed 4 Tbsp 4-6 Hours 4-6 Days 3/4-1 Inch 3-4 Cups
Lentil 3/4 Cup 8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-1 Inch 4 Cups
Millet 1 Cup 5 Hours 12 Hours 1/16 Inch 3 Cups
Mung Beans 1/3 Cup 8 Hours 4-5 Days 1/4-3 Inches 4 Cups
Mustard Seed 3 Tbsp 5 Hours 3-5 Days 1/2-1 1/2 Inches 3 Cups
Oats, Hulled 1 Cup 8 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 1 Cup
Onion Seed 1 Tbsp 4-6 Hours 4-5 Days 1-2 Inches 1 1/2-2 Cups
Pea 1 Cup 8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-1 Inch 3 Cups
Pinto Bean 1 Cup 12 Hours 3-4 Days 1/2-1 Inch 3-4 Cups
Pumpkin 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 2 Cups
Quinoa 1 Cup 3-4 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2 Inch 3 Cups
Radish 3 Tbsp 6 Hours 3-5 Days 3/4-2 Inches 4 Cups
Rye 1 Cup 6-8 Hours 2-3 Days 1/2-3/4 Inch 3 Cups
Sesame Seed,
Hulled
1 Cup 8 Hours 1 1/2 Cups
Sesame Seed,
Unhulled
1 Cup 4-6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 1 Cup
Spelt 1 Cup 6 Hours 1-2 Days 1/4 Inch 3 Cups
Sunflower, Hulled 1 Cup 6-8 Hours 1 Day 1/4-1/2 Inch 2 Cups
Teff 1 Cup 3-4 Hours 1-2 Days 1/8 Inch 3 Cups
Walnuts 3 Cups 4 Hours 4 Cups
Wheat 1 Cup 8-10 Hours 2-3 Days 1/4-3/4 Inch 3 Cups
Wild Rice 1 Cup 12 Hours 2-3 Days Rice Splits 3 Cups

23 Responses to “Soak Time For Common Seeds, Nuts, Beans and Grains”

  1. carol October 16, 2015 at 9:48 am #

    Where is the best place to get large sacks of mung, whole dry peas (split won't sprout, will they?) etc.

    Do they have to be organic?

    • Ben Greenfield January 17, 2016 at 1:06 pm #

      Get them here: amzn.to/1Jb32eX And organic is far better. They are not sprayed and the soil quality that they are grown in is far superior.

  2. Bilal November 21, 2015 at 4:20 pm #

    Hey Ben , do you mean they are fermented after the given soaking time and ready to eat ? Or should i then cook them ? Please explain , ty

    • Ben Greenfield December 21, 2015 at 8:45 pm #

      Eat what you'd usually eat raw, and cook what you'd usually cook.

      • Amin August 22, 2016 at 6:42 am #

        I don’t understand this answer! Raw or cooked sprouts? And what about e.coli contamination?

  3. Sandy January 20, 2016 at 9:27 am #

    If I buy a bag of walnuts…should I still soak them for better digestion?

  4. John March 5, 2016 at 11:00 am #

    How long will they keep after soaking? Can I put them back into the freezer after soaking? Thanks!

    • Ben Greenfield March 7, 2016 at 1:24 pm #

      If you put them in the fridge they'll last a week after soaking.

      • Sonii March 11, 2016 at 7:38 am #

        I was taught to soak them and then dry them in a low oven or dehydrator to make them crispy nuts, then you could freeze them again to keep them super fresh for snacking.

  5. Martha Marks April 8, 2016 at 9:03 am #

    Do I have to soak Organic Natures Earthly Choice Premium Quinoa before I cook it. It doesn’t say on the package so I asume I don’t have to soak it. Could please help me. Thank you. Martha

  6. Akki May 1, 2016 at 10:49 pm #

    Sir, which is better, hulled or unhulled soaked sesame seeds

  7. Z.Oost September 26, 2016 at 3:06 am #

    Hey Bro, are the soak/sprout times for brown rice the same as for wild rice? Just curious, thanks!

    • Ben Greenfield October 14, 2016 at 4:31 pm #

      The soak time is the same. The sprouting time may vary from variety to variety.

  8. Carrie October 21, 2016 at 7:36 am #

    Thanks for sharing this chart, it’s awesome! When I soak me grains, legumes, nuts, etc I add a soaking agent like sea salt, whey, ACV, ect…Wondering why you don’t add that info for novices and/or if you think its not necessary.

    BTW…you’re podcasts and all the info you share ROCKS!

    • Ben Greenfield October 21, 2016 at 1:04 pm #

      Hey Carrie – that's great! And thank you! It's not absolutely necessary so we don't like to complicate things..

  9. Ignacio November 20, 2016 at 7:57 am #

    Hey Ben, I’m a little confused about sprouting stuff like amaranth and quinoa, am I supposed to cook it after sprouting to get the nutrients with fewer of the antinutrients… Or sprouting is a replacement of cooking.

    Thanks!

    • Ignacio November 20, 2016 at 8:08 am #

      Also in Beyond Training… In the waffle recipe with Spouted grains… Are they supposed to be cooked (in a rice cooker for example) after sprouting them… Of sprouting and then directly to the waffle iron?

      I had been cooking amaranth and then ‘waffling’ it… I wonder if I have been affecting the nutritional content by booking in a rice cooker and then in the waffle maker.

      Thanks again!

      • Ben Greenfield December 3, 2016 at 7:15 pm #

        You don't need to cook it in the rice cooker first. The one time cook in the waffle maker should be sufficient.

    • Ben Greenfield November 21, 2016 at 10:22 am #

      Sprout then cook for quinoa and amaranth – some can be sprouted in eaten raw also though, like seeds and nuts.

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